Detained in Monimbó, Three Days Later Found In The Morgue

Arrested in Monimbó, he ends in the morgue. The father of the young man reported missing for three days after his arrest, he went looking for his son in hospitals, health centers, even in the city of Diriamba, where they supposedly had him, but this proved to be false information.

The Face of Anguish. Edgardo Antonio Hernández’s wife, with their 18 month old daughter, holds a photo of her slain husband. El Nuevo Diario

In fact, Edgardo Antonio Hernández, 30, was detained on July 17 in Monimbó neighborhood, in the city of Masaya, a block from his house by hooded armed civilians who operated with the police, and three days later his relatives found him dead in the morgue in Managua.

His relatives say that Edgard’s body showed signs of torture, for which they blame the pro-government forces and demand justice.

Agustín Hernández, Edgardo‘s father, recalled that “those days were very tense in Monimbó, the riot police and the paramilitaries were taking the ‘muchachos’ (young men); My son was about to arrive home when he was arrested, I saw how they began to beat him mercilessly, they put him in the truck and then knew nothing of him”.

“My son was not found anywhere, we exhausted our hope because he was not in the police delegation either. We traveled to Managua, looking for him in El Chipote (prison), but he was not there either until finally we went to Medicina Legal (morgue) and there was the body of my dead son,” said the dad crying.

Relatives of Edgard Hernández ask international institutions and agencies to investigate the murder of the young man, whom they describe as an honest and hardworking person, who did not deserve to die in such a cruel way.

Edgardo Hernández left behind his young wife and a year and a half old daughter.

Source (in Spanish): El Nuevo Diario

Article originally appeared on Today Nicaragua and is republished here with permission.

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